Back to Basics

images

The term employee engagement is becoming a popular phrase, floating around many company offices as the next buzzword. It’s seen as a measure of success for employers; an end goal for companies to meet their recruiting needs. Once employers believe their employees are engaged, they think their work is done. Of course, engaged employees are necessary for the success of a company, but simple engagement only scratches the surface. Employee engagement can only be favorable, and a positive asset to companies if employees understand why they are engaged. Why does the company do what it does? What is its purpose for its employees, and its mission for its customers? To easily break down the types of engagement, Forbes released an article that tackles the three kinds of engagement: compliant, contributing, and committed.

Committed – At the highest level are the people trying to do “good for others.” They care about the organization’s purpose and teach others as part of their own self-actualization.

Contributing – One level up, contributors do things they are “good at.” They collaborate with others and help as they seek belonging and self-esteem.

Compliant – At the first level of engagement, compliant people “do no harm.” They show up. They observe. They focus on what’s “good for me” and meet the minimum requirements to satisfy their biological and physiological needs.”

The majority of engaged employees fall under compliant and contributing. Those employees have lost the purpose behind their work. In the other category, the committed employee understands the purpose of the company and its services. The employee recognizes that the organization’s purpose is the biggest driver for their engagement.

Companies that find it difficult to engage employees need to get back to the basics. WHY is the company doing what its doing? Once the mission is clearly established, finding employees who agree with that mission will be a lot clearer.

Companies- hire for the ‘why’. Employees- work for the ‘why’.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: